Poker Games and Rules

Get started in online poker

Rio All Suite Hotel and Casino Tournament

Well, the good news is that I made it to the final table and I’ll be on ESPN. The bad news is that I finished ninth. Even though it stings a little, I’m happy because once I made it to the final table, I played as well as I possibly could. The thing that hurts is knowing that if I’d accumulated some chips, I could’ve taken everyone there.

I truly felt that I was the best holdem player at the table (of course, I’m sure we all felt that way).

I think all three hands I participated in will probably make it to TV. Out of about 40 hands, I folded 37 times and played just three. I took a flop with 3-3 in the small blind position. The flop was A-10-2 and I folded. (This was a really big pot, but I’ll let you wait for the telecast to see what happened).

I was then blinded away down to 10,000 (the blinds were 5,000-10,000 and I started the final table with only 61,000 in chips) when I picked up pocket eights. I moved all-in and the small blind called. When the board finished 10-5-2-10-K, I tripled up and had 30,000 in front of me.

Later on, under the gun, I picked up kings. I made it 20,000. The player after me made it 30,000. The small blind called, and then the big blind called. Not exactly what I was hoping for, but I did have a chance to quadruple up. The flop came 8-5-2. Not too bad, I felt. The small blind fired out, followed by a couple of calls (I was all-in). I didn’t like the fact that everyone was in, but still felt I had the best hand.

The turn was a 10. Bet, call, call. The river was a seven, putting three hearts on the board (the flop had two hearts). I didn’t love this river card, but thought I had a chance when the betting went bet-fold-fold. I was hoping that the small blind had J-J or Q-Q. He had 10-10. He turned a set of tens and that was all she wrote. I finished in ninth place and picked up $28,950.

It’s painful because I know if my kings had held up, I would’ve had some ammo and could have done some damage (as well as at least move up a few spots and pick up $100,000+ in prize money), but what can you do? Even if I had a huge supply of chips for that hand, I’d probably go broke anyway because I’d be unable to get away from the kings.

My goal from the outset was to at least make a final table, which, amazingly, has been accomplished already. I guess I’ll now have to adjust my goal and set my sights a little higher — I would like to win one of these events and bring home a bracelet!

I’m taking a two-day hiatus from poker because I’m exhausted. I think I’ll take another crack at the 80-160 game at the Bellagio on Thursday. Then, on Friday, I’ll play my next tournament. I was originally planning to play in tomorrow’s event, which also happens to be a six-player-max-table no-limit tourney (I would love to try that), but I’m emotionally and physically drained, I need some cheap nutritional supplements to overcome my descent.

I’d also like to compete for the Toyota WSOP Player of the Year title, if possible, and entering as many events as you can helps, but I’m just not up to it. My plan is to go to the Bellagio to play in the cash game and try to win buy-in money for the next WSOP event.

I’m up around $30,000 for the trip so far and it would be nice if the money I set aside to enter these tournaments could stay untouched. My new formula for success: play cash games for buy-in money, then make real money in the events themselves.

Results as Reported on www.pokerpages.com

THE FINAL TABLE:

SEAT 1: Wing Wong 54,000
SEAT 2: Eric Froehlich 192,000
SEAT 3: Jason Steinhorn 207,000
SEAT 4: Christian Van Hees 175,000
SEAT 5: Brian Mogelefsky 61,000
SEAT 6: Todd Witteles 134,000
SEAT 7: Peter Costa 153,000
SEAT 8: Zelong Dong 166,000
SEAT 9: Devon Armstrong 209,000
SEAT 10: Adam Hersh 248,000

Players were eliminated as follows:

9th Place – Brian Mogelefsky took a tough beat when he was dealt K-K against Jason Steinhorn’s 10-10. All of Mogelefsky’s chips were in the pot after the flop and it looked as if the 27-year-old New Yorker might double up. But a 10 on the turn gave Steinhorn a set, and poisoned the pocket kings. Mogelefsky earned $28,950.